The Food Industry And Their Partnerships

http://nutritionfacts.org/video/collaboration-with-the-new-vectors-of-disease/

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Whitewashed: How Industry and Government Promote Dairy Junk Foods

The United States is in the midst of a public health epidemic due to poor diet. While much of the focus has been on obvious culprits such as sugary soft drinks and fast food, dairy foods often get a pass. The dairy industry, propped up by government, has convinced us of the health benefits of milk and other dairy products. But the context of how people consume dairy matters.

My new report, Whitewashed: How Industry and Government Promote Dairy Junk Foods, shines a light on the shifting patterns of consumption away from plain milk toward dairy products laden with sugar, fat, and salt. For example:

  • About half of all milk is consumed either as flavored milk, with cereal, or in a drink;
  • Nearly half of the milk supply goes to make about 9 billion pounds of cheese and 1.5 billion gallons of frozen desserts–two-thirds of which is ice cream;
  • 11 percent of all sugar goes into the production of dairy products.

It’s bad enough for the dairy industry to promote junk food in the name of health, but making matters worse, Uncle Sam is propping up the effort. The federal government mandates the collection of industry fees for “checkoff programs” to promote milk and dairy. Far from being just a privately-funded program, U.S. Department of Agriculture employees attend checkoff meetings, monitor activities, and are responsible for evaluation of the programs. The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the legality of the checkoff programs as “government speech”, finding: “the message … is controlled by the Federal Government.”

Checkoff money is also only supposed to be used for “generic” marketing activities. However, the program gives a huge boost to leading fast food chains. For example:

  • McDonald’s has six dedicated dairy checkoff program employees at its corporate headquarters who work to ensure that dairy plays an important role in McDonald’s product development;
  • The dairy checkoff program helped Taco Bell introduce its double steak quesadillas and cheese shreds, which resulted in a four percent increase in the chain’s dairy sales;
  • The dairy checkoff program helped Pizza Hut develop a 3-Cheese Stuffed Crust Pizza and the “Summer of Cheese” ad campaign;
  • Dominos benefitted from a $35 million partnership with the dairy checkoff program, resulting in the company adding more cheese, with other pizza makers following their lead;
  • Domino’s “Smart Slice” program brought the pizza to more than 2,000 schools in 2011, with help from the checkoff.

Speaking of schools, the dairy industry, with a government assist, is heavily promoting chocolate and other sugar milks to schoolchildren, desperate to maintain its presence in a lucrative market with a captive audience. For example:

  • USDA’s milk checkoff program promotes “Chocolate Milk Has Muscle” and “Raise Your Hand for Chocolate Milk” campaigns to defend chocolate milk;
  • Dean Foods’ TruMoo is a popular brand sold in schools; one serving of TruMoo strawberry milk contains an incredible 21 grams of sugar;
  • Milk checkoff educational materials were even used to change the mind of one school official who was planning to remove flavored milk.

Finally, many federal checkoff-funded dairy organizations make dubious health claims to market their dressed up junk foods. Would you believe that:

  • “Cheese can fit into almost any eating plan”;
  • “Process cheese is made from natural cheese”;
  • “Cheese contributes essential nutrients for good health”;
  • “Chocolate milk is the perfect balance of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates and protein—a combination that can’t be found in any other beverage”.

At a time when our nation is suffering from an epidemic of diet-related health problems, we cannot allow the decades of whitewashing by the dairy industry to continue. The assumption that eating dairy is essential to the diet has obstructed our ability to criticize federal government support for unhealthy forms of dairy.

It’s time to stop dancing around the federal checkoff programs by pretending they are privately-funded. As this report demonstrates, federal government administers, oversees, and approves almost every aspect of the dairy checkoff program. These funds are directly used to promote junk foods, which are contributing to the diseases our federal government is allegedly trying to prevent.

Andy Bellatti is a registered dietitian who contributed to the report by calling out the many misleading health claims made by the dairy industry. He says:

In our cultural glorification of dairy, we often forget that many of these products are directly contributing to our current public health epidemic. Even more troubling, due to the dairy industry’s deep pockets and political connections, federal authorities are giving these foods a stamp of approval, rather than raising a nutritional red flag.

Source: http://www.eatdrinkpolitics.com/2014/06/11/whitewashed-how-industry-and-government-promote-dairy-junk-foods

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No meat, no dairy, no problem: is 2014 the year vegans become mainstream?

This year will see the German supermarket chain ‘Veganz – We Love Life’ opening its first branch in the UK, offering over 6,000 vegan products. The store is hoping to take advantage of increasing interest in non-meat, non-dairy food, with celebrities such as Jay Z and Beyoncé among those to have reportedly tried adopting veganism.

Most UK supermarkets already stock vegan products, but Veganz is the first dedicated chain store of its kind in Europe. Set up in 2011, the company hopes to open a total of 21 stores across the continent by 2015 to meet growing demand.

The choice of not consuming any animal products at all is currently being promoted by Mark Bittman’s book VB6, which takes a “flexitarian” approach – advocating eating a vegan diet before 6pm.

“By going 100 per cent vegan I think people are missing the boat,” said Mr Bittman. “The question is not how challenging you can make your diet but how sane you can make it; there’s nothing wrong with animal products in moderation,” he says.

“The problem is huge-scale industrial production of agriculture and, of course, our consumption of junk food – which may or may not be moderated by ‘going vegan’. What we need is for most people to move on the spectrum closer to a diet that includes way more unprocessed plants than we’re used to eating, and correspondingly less animal products and junk. ”

Veganism has long been plagued by stereotypes of it proponents. But what will dedicated full-time proponents of the lifestyle choice – its title officially coined in 1944 by founder of the British Vegan Society Donald Watson – make of the part-timers and the potential for it to become the latest fad diet?

Amanda Baker, senior advocacy and policy officer of the Vegan Society, is not overly concerned, and welcomed the potential for it to grow in popularity. “From our point of view, people are beginning to recognise the arguments that we have been making all along,” she said. “We all teach our children that it’s wrong to harm animals unnecessarily and a plant-based diet can be really healthy.”

The Vegan Society estimates that there are at least 150,000 vegans in the UK. With a population of around 63 million, that’s less than one per cent, but the term “vegan” will soon have legal status. In 2010 the European Parliament adopted UK Food Standards Agency labelling guidelines and, following a five year period for compliance, civil suits may be brought against anyone misusing the term from 2015.

This is yet more welcome news to the Vegan Society. “Veganism is a lifestyle and an ethical way of looking at the world. It is a human right to be vegan and a protected philosophy,” said Ms Baker.

“We enjoy our vegan lives and we want others to share the benefits. It helps to have people talking positively about it, especially high profile figures like Bill Clinton and Al Gore.”

However, there remains a disjunction between the principles of veganism adhered to by devotees like Ms Barker and the standards kept by the more casual believers.

The Vegan Society defines the lifestyle as “a way of living that seeks to exclude, as far as possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing and any other purpose.” Yet Bill Clinton has admitted to eating fish or eggs once a week and Beyoncé dined at an LA vegan restaurant in none other than a fur coat earlier this month.

 

Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/features/no-meat-no-dairy-no-problem-is-2014-the-year-vegans-become-mainstream-9032064.html

Don’t Let Fast Food Companies BRAINWASH Our Kids!

This is an amazing TED talk! It all starts with education and if we want to educate our future generations to eat healthy and protect our environment and raise them compassionate, caring, healthy and happy, we need to end these evil marketing strategies from the fast food industry. Imagine the world we would live in if we had 2 billion dollars to show the truth and consequences on health, environment, human and animal rights to our children and teenagers.

Brilliant Video Watch Here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bop3D7-dDM

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Fast-food marketing has brainwashed kids and targets minorities, says study

Aggressive advertising by fast-food companies has taught 15% of preschoolers to ask to go to McDonald’s every day, and convinced teens it’s OK to consume as many as 1,100 calories in a single meal, says asharply critical study of the industry’s marketing tactics from Yale’s Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity.

Fast-food marketing to children as young as 2 was so effective in 2009 that two-fifths of U.S. children younger than 11 ask their parents to go to McDonald’s at least once a week, says the study — and 84% of parents admit to obliging.

Minority kids are disproportionately targeted by the ads, with McDonald’s and KFC taking the lead in targeting African-American youth with TV advertising, dedicated websites, and banner ads. Such ads feature foods that contain twice as many calories as ads aimed at white children, and African-American children see at least 50% more fast-food ads than their white peers, the study said.

Even when advertising features adult-targeted teasers — what the report calls “secondhand exposure to ads” — it’s so successful that almost a third of children old enough to choose their meal (ages 6-11) ask for regular-sized combo meals rather than kid-sized versions.

Fast-food combo meals contain more than half of young people’s daily recommended sodium intake and about half their total daily calories, 30% of which come from sugar and saturated fat, the report said.

McDonald’s and Burger King lead the pack in promoting unhealthy eating behaviors when they automatically serve French fries with meals 84% of the time, and soft drinks at least 55% of the time, though in child-targeted ads only healthy side orders and beverages are shown, the report said.

Wendy’s and Taco Bell also push unhealthy sides, though they too have at least one healthy side dish and beverage option, the study found.

“Despite pledges to improve their marketing practices, fast food companies seem to be stepping up their efforts to target kids,” said Jennifer Harris, the lead study author, in a statement. Harris noted that preschoolers today see 21% more fast food ads on TV than they did in 2003. Somewhat older children see 34% more.

The report examined the marketing efforts of 12 of the nation’s largest fast food chains and tallied the calories, fat, sugar and sodium in more than 3,000 kids’ meals combinations and 2,781 single menu items. The results revealed that out of these, only 12 kids’ meals met nutrition criteria for preschoolers, and only 15 for older children.

McDonald’s is also responsible for one-quarter of all Spanish-language fast food ads, meaning the average Hispanic preschooler sees 290 ads per year. Taco Bell, Domino’s, Dairy Queen and Sonic specifically go after teens, mostly with ads for calorie-laden desserts and snacks.

Subway was the sole exception to the trend, offering youngsters healthy sides and beverages 60% of the time.

The worst kids’ meal combinations were Dairy Queen’s Original Cheeseburger with a side of French fries and a Chocolate Dilly Bar (973 calories), trailed by McDonald’s Double Cheeseburger with French fries and Hi-C Orange Lavaburst drink (830 calories) and KFC’s Popcorn chicken with potato wedges and a side of string cheese (820 calories and a whopping 1, 820 mg of sodium).

 

Source: http://www.dailyfinance.com/2010/11/09/fast-food-marketing-has-brainwashed-kids-and-targets-minorities/